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The following is a review of diagnostics related medical research worldwide

The information is updated the first week of every month - so ... make this a regular stop in your information gathering activities.

The following information has been compiled from publicly available Sources, StratCom does not assume any responsibility for the accuracy or the authenticity of the information and StratCom cannot be held liable for errors.

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Research News for December 1999

Cerus Corporation has begun clinical trials of the company's proprietary systems to inactivate viruses, bacteria and other pathogens in blood products (platelets, fresh frozen plasma and red blood cells) intended for transfusion. The Cerus pathogen inactivation systems for platelets and FFP are based on the company's proprietary light-activated psoralen compound, S-59, and its system for red blood cells is based on its proprietary pH-activated compound, S-303. These compounds have been developed to target and inactivate blood-borne pathogens, while leaving intact the therapeutic properties of the blood products.

A new blood test for a protein called guanylyl cyclase C, or GCC, one of seven proteins made only by intestinal cells and colorectal cancer cells, developed at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia could give a clearer idea of whether colorectal cancer is likely to spread, or return after surgery. The test has been used in a study funded by the National Institutes of Health and Targeted Diagnostics & Therapeutics Inc. The findings appear in the Dec. 7 1999 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine. The researchers reported that the test is sensitive enough to detect a single cancer cell among 10 million normal cells.

Spanish researchers at the Hospital General Universitario de Alicante, compared levels of CYFRA 21-1 and NMP22, two proteins found in urine and have concluded that the presence of these analytes in the urine of bladder cancer patients could be the basis for a new, non-invasive test for bladder cancer. According to the investigators, NMP22 and CYFRA 21-1 urine tests correctly detected 75.7% and 83.8% of bladder cancers, respectively. Using the two markers in combination, researchers were able to accurately spot nearly 90% of bladder cancers.

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