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The following is a review of diagnostics related medical research worldwide

The information is updated the first week of every month - so ... make this a regular stop in your information gathering activities.

The following information has been compiled from publicly available Sources, StratCom does not assume any responsibility for the accuracy or the authenticity of the information and StratCom cannot be held liable for errors.

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Research News for March 2000

Scientists from Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Yale University School of Medicine, reported they have discovered that elevations in harmful complement activation in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are associated with worse clinical symptoms and a reduced rate of event-free survival at six months. Alexion's C5 Complement Inhibitor humanized monoclonal antibody 5G1.1 specifically blocks the production of harmful complement components and may be useful in treatment of this patient population.

A UCLA study reported in the March 21, 2000 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) showed that E. coli, the bacteria causing kidney infections, one of the most common serious infections affecting adult women, has become resistant to a standard antibiotic, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole or TMP/SMX (also known as Bactrim and Septra, a standard antibiotic for kidney infections. The study also showed that Ciprofloxacin demonstrated greater efficacy.

Scientists headed by Dr. David Sidransky, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine are working on a cancer-detection method that uses bodily fluids, such as urine and saliva, may one day help patients avoid an invasive biopsy. According to a report in the March 17, 2000 issue of Science, the research found that urine, saliva, or lung fluids can reveal specific genetic mutations that signal cancer of the bladder, head and neck, or lungs. The test examines DNA in mitochondria, which are specialized energy-producing compartments found outside of the nucleus of a cell. Because every cell contains numerous copies of mitochondrial DNA but only two copies of DNA in the nucleus, the researchers guessed that mitochondrial mutations would be easier to spot in body fluids.

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